Author Archives: kkovarik

Thank You!

Sorry for the lack of posts; between getting ready to go on vacation, going on vacation, then recovering from vacation, I just didn’t have a lot of time! However, I’ll share much more about our trip to the East Coast soon. As a teaser, go ahead and Google Mount Race in Sheffield, Massachusetts. Me and my very tired legs climbed that little hill!

In the meantime, I wanted to share the grand total from our Lucky’s 5% Day: $1902.83! We can’t thank everyone enough for heading to Lucky’s and buying something. We’ve got great plans for the money to make LOUA even better than it already is.

Thank you so much!

Until next time!

Lower Olentangy Urban Arboretum Earth Day Follow Up Event

big pileWhen: Saturday, August  2, 9:00 AM – 1:30 PM
Where: Glen Echo Ravine West “The Walker Tract”

Directions: Our work area is a wooded area just west of the Indianola Bridge that spans Glen Echo Ravine. The site is visible from the bridge and is bordered to the north by the alleyway south of Olentangy St.  The southern border of the site is the stream that runs through Glen Echo Ravine. You can park either along Indianola Ave. near the bridge or on Olentangy St. between Indianola and Medary.  If you enter the ravine at the Indianola Ave. Bridge, there is a stairway on the Northeast side of the bridge that leads down into the ravine. At the bottom of the stairs, head west (to your right) and right after you pass beneath the bridge, be on the lookout for a trail on your right that passes through an open grassland and eventually enters the forested area where we will be working.  If you plan to enter the area via Olentangy St. alley, there is a path that enters the ravine about mid-way between the Parkview Condominiums and the Xenos School.  There is a city park sign near the path’s entrance.  If you have work gloves and/or shovels and/or bow saws, please bring them.  There is some poison ivy present so dress accordingly.

Activities: Removal of invasive species.

The Walker Tract is a parcel of city parkland and part of Glen Echo ravine. The understory of this site was formerly choked with invasive plants. Work on clearing this area began on Earth Day in 2009. Since then significant progress has been achieved but more work needs to be done to finish what we started. We will be working in conjunction with Karl Hoessle, an Ecological Restoration Programmer from the city’s Recreation and Parks Department which means we will accomplish more than we would without his assistance. In addition to honeysuckle, the area still has a fair amount of privet, burning bush, and especially creeping euonymus that needs to be removed.

Questions: let me a comment!

What’s Flying Around In Our Garden

Just a quick post – it’s too nice outside to be inside!

This little beauty has been buzzing around our garden. He (or she – who can tell?) seems to like the native phlox that we have in the yard and also the bee balm.

Hemaris thysbe profile Hemaris thysbeIt’s quite interesting to watch, how it hovers over the flowers like a hummingbird. Probably where it got its common name! My aunt had one in her yard and was certain it was the smallest hummer she had ever seen.

For those of you who are wondering, the Latin name is Hemaris thysbe (Fabricius, 1775). The insect has a range from Alaska and the Northwest Territories south through British Columbia to Oregon; east through the Great Plains and the Great Lakes area to Maine and Newfoundland; south to Florida and Texas. It’s really quite a beautiful thing to see.

Until next time!

LOUA’s Lucky Day!

luckyslogoI don’t know if many of you know, but Lucky’s Market in Clintonville has a 5% Day where they partner with local non-profits to donate (strangely enough) 5% percent of their total sales for that day to said partner.

Well, LOUA is going to be Lucky’s 5% Day Partner for August!

What does this mean to you? It means that you need to head to Lucky’s to go shopping on

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

for all of your fresh veggies, meats, and dairy. And bread, and crackers, and spices, and soup and well, you get the picture.

And what does it mean for us? The more you shop, the more money LOUA will get to help the Arboretum thrive.

So save up all your shopping at Lucky’s for Tuesday, August 12, 2014, 2770 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43202

Until next time!

Upcoming Events

compostStream Clean Up Event at Glen Echo Park

Sat, July 19, 9am – 12pm
Calumet Christian School
2774 Calumet St, Columbus, OH 43202 (map)

FLOW and Anheuser Busch are teaming up with River Network for a Stream Clean Up. Volunteers are needed to help pick up litter, weed the butterfly garden, affix storm drain markers and help with planning and picnic logistics. We’ll meet at the Calumet Christian School.

Please RSVP to (614) 267-3386 or send us a message at info@olentangywatershed.org so we know how many will join us for the picnic! Registration will open soon at http://www.budweiser.com.


Composting Workshop

August 16 at 1pm
513 Piedmont Rd. Columbus OH 43214.

Please join FLOW for a SWACO-supported workshop for a home composting workshops for our watershed residents. We want to encourage you to save your yard and kitchen waste and recycle it into topsoil that you can use. The soil will provide the nutrients that your veggies, flowers, or trees need to be healthy!

Remove more than 500 lbs of organic matter from your household waste per year, diverting it from collection, the landfill.

  • Provides a nutrient rich “super soil” to add to your garden, lawn and house plants
  • Takes as little as 10 minutes a week
  • Reduces use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides
  • Can Reduce gardening water bill by 30%

See Compost Workshop Trifold Order Form for more details.

Register by mailing a check for the composter ($30) and other items to FLOW at 3528 N. High St., Suite F Columbus OH 43214, or pay via Paypal on FLOW’s website. This will be the final composting workshop of the season, and spaces are limited, so sign up today.

Until next time!

Clifton Gorge

This past Sunday, Pete and I went to Clifton Gorge State Nature Preserve. We’ve been there a few times, the first being with his mom and her college roommate, so it holds a very special place in my heart. It’s one of my favorite places to walk, with the sound of rushing water, ferns, limestone, and cliffs. Tons of native plants, although we did see a few invasives. It looks like they are working on restoring the area.

If you need a little relaxation, just listen to the video. Nothing more peaceful (at least to me) than rushing water…

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Long-tailed salamander (Eurycea longicauda)

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Steamboat Rock

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Limestone cliffs

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Wild ginger and ferns

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More cliffs

BioBlitz 2014 Update

Glen EchoWe’ve finally tallied all of the various insects, creepy crawlies, snakes, birds, plants and amphibians from BioBlitz 2014. It took a little bit longer to organize as we had last year’s data to compare to this year’s. Despite the rain – and a huge thanks to everyone who stopped by or volunteered during the 12 hours we collected – we manged to find new things! If you are interested in the list, you can find in this Excel file: Glen Echo Bioblitz 2014. We found nearly 140 species.

And I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a shout out to Mike Graziano, who did the lion’s share of work to organize the whole event. I look forward to next year’s BioBlitz. It’s lovely to see what new things we can find, which simply means that the changes we’ve made in Glen Echo, such as removing invasive plants – have made a difference.

On a less happy note, the one egg that was in the new finch nest is no more. It’s been smashed with evidence of feathers around. I am assuming that whatever attacked the nest did so either while Mama or Papa Finch were nearby. I know it’s what happens, but I don’t have to like it. A least I had one batch of babies make it the whole way through and leave the nest…

Until next time!